Video of the Day: “Come Together” Official “Justice League” Music Video

Gary Clark Jr’s “Come Together” cover single from “Justice League”

From Warner Entertainment comes Gary Clark Jr.’s cover of the Beatles’ Come Together from the Justice League movie soundtrack.  You know how this stuff works – they stick in extra music in the tail credits so that they can use the movie to promote an artist, or so that they can use the artist to help promote the movie. It works both ways, and some of the coolest music from a movie soundtrack often comes from one of these end credits add-ins.

Clark’s cover of this iconic Beatles song really fits, though, with the gritty pulse of the song’s relentless rhythm mirroring the epic battle scenes we’ve seen in the trailers. It’s no wonder that the cut was selected as the film’s anthem.

Speaking to Guitar World back in May about his evolution in the studio, Clark said “I’m getting more comfortable in that environment. I’m beginning to enjoy the process of having an idea and letting it develop and evolve organically.”

“I’ve really started acquiring the strength to follow my own instincts, rather than being persuaded or tempted to listen to outside opinions,” he continued. “I’m more confident and less prone to go down that rabbit hole of darkness and doubt, which has happened to me multiple times.”

The song was produced by Junkie XL, Mike Elizondo and Sam de Jong and recorded at The Village Recorders in Los Angeles. Junkie XL composed the score for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, but Danny Elfman will be providing the score for the new film.

Fans have been looking forward to the Justice League movie with anticipation. The gritty tone of the DC extended universe as portrayed in film has attracted criticism, but this is leavened somewhat by the wild success of the Wonder Woman movie, and Justice League seems to have a sense of humor (a quality notably lacking in Batman v Superman).

Justice League makes its debut in theaters on November 17.



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