230px-StanGoldberg11.15.08ByLuigiNovi1by Michael Brown, staff writer

Stan Goldberg, revered artist for Archie Comics and Marvel Comics, passed away September 1, 2014, due to complications from a stroke he had suffered two weeks ago.

Goldberg’s career began in the 1940s with Timely Comics, then Atlas Comics, both of which were the predecessors to Marvel. He would work for Marvel, right alongside greats such as Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, until 1969. At Marvel, he designed the color schemes for both Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

After a very brief stint at DC, Goldberg moved on to Archie Comics, where he would spend the next 40 years drawing the adventures of Archie, Veronica, Betty, Jughead, and the rest of the gang, in both comics and newspaper strips. His most widely recognized work is the cover of Archie Meets the Punisher, an Archie/Marvel crossover from 1994 that did very well in sales.

The Archie Comics version of Archie Meets the Punisher. (Aug. 1994) The Marvel Comics version had a different cover and was called The Punisher Meets Archie

The Archie Comics version of Archie Meets the Punisher. (Aug. 1994)
The Marvel Comics version had a different cover and was called The Punisher Meets Archie

Abruptly and without explanation, Goldberg left Archie Comics in 2010, and did freelance work for both Marvel and DC. In the early 1980s, Goldberg worked on DC’s Captain Carrot and the Amazing Zoo Crew, and in the last few years he had done work on Marvel’s FF #1 from 2011, and in Bongo Comics, publisher of The Simpsons comics, where he drew an Archie-parody in an issue of Bart Simpson.

In 1994, Goldberg won the Inkpot Award from San Diego Comic-Con, and, more recently in 2012, the National Cartoonists Society presented him with their prestigious Gold Key Award. Marvel will be posthumously publishing his Archie-styled Spider-Man short story called, That Parker Boy, written by Tom DeFalco in Marvel’s 75th Anniversary Special, due to be released October 2014.

“Stan was a cartoonist … and a more devoted one, you could never find,” said Mark Evanier, comics historian. “He was also a charming man who was always willing to talk about his days as Marvel’s star colorist or the many decades he spent drawing Archie and other comics in much the same style. The number of pages he produced in his lifetime was staggering.”

Stan Goldberg was 82.

We at Krypton Radio join the comics community in mourning at the loss of a great man who gave a great contribution to the comics industry.

-30-