The much-awaited Patty Jenkins directed Wonder Woman 1984, starring Gal Gadot in the title role, has been lurching along in the release pipeline while Warner Bros. tries to figure out how not to lose their shirts over it while a pandemic wreaks its havoc . Now, at long last, we know when it’s going to hit the theaters, and that date is December 25, 2020.

Fast forward to the 1980s as Wonder Woman’s next big screen adventure finds her facing two all-new foes: Max Lord and The Cheetah.

This newest trailer – and presumably the last one we’ll see before the film’s release – paints a pretty good picture of what we can expect to see. The question of how Steve Trevor comes back to life is explained pretty well. Max Lord has somehow come into some real supernatural power, creating mayhem as everyone in the world suddenly gets their fondest desires. This also creates The Cheetah from Kristen Wiig’s Barbara Minerva.

With director Patty Jenkins back at the helm and Gal Gadot returning in the title role, Wonder Woman 1984 is Warner Bros. Pictures’ follow up to the DC Super Hero’s first outing, 2017’s record-breaking Wonder Woman, which took in $822 million at the worldwide box office. The film also stars Chris Pine as Steve Trevor, Kristen Wiig as The Cheetah, Pedro Pascal as Max Lord, Robin Wright as Antiope, and Connie Nielsen as Hippolyta.

Charles Roven, Deborah Snyder, Zack Snyder, Patty Jenkins, Gal Gadot and Stephen Jones are producing the film. Rebecca Steel Roven Oakley, Richard Suckle, Marianne Jenkins, Geoff Johns, Walter Hamada, Chantal Nong Vo and Wesley Coller are the executive producers.

Patty Jenkins directed from a screenplay she wrote with Geoff Johns & David Callaham, story by Jenkins & Johns, based on characters from DC. Joining the director behind the scenes are several members of her Wonder Woman team, including director of photography Matthew Jensen, Oscar-nominated production designer Aline Bonetto (Amélie), and Oscar-winning costume designer Lindy Hemming (Topsy-Turvy). Oscar-nominated editor Richard Pearson (United 93) is cutting the film. The music is by Oscar-winning composer Hans Zimmer (Dunkirk, The Lion King).

The realities of movie distribution during a pandemic are not lost on Warner Bros. In a move sure to frustrate the movie houses, the film is being simultaneously released on HBO Max, Warner Bros. own streaming service. While this does kneecap theatrical box office receipts, it also drives new subscribership for the streaming service. Thanks to COVID-19, most of the people who would ordinarily have gone to the theater to see the film will be forced to sign up for HBO Max instead if they want to see it. There are places in the world where the virus is mostly under control, but the U.S.A., the primary market for films like this, is not one of those places.

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